IEDC Neighborhood Development Strategies

Course Description

This practitioner-driven course uses the case study method to complement current neighborhood development theory. Participants will learn how to identify the major neighborhood actors, their objectives, and strategies for redevelopment, in addition to understanding the process for creating a strategic economic development plan to meet the neighborhood development goals. Specifically, this course will examine social capital (e.g., linkages, networks, talent, etc.), environmental capital (e.g., stewardship, residual management, etc.) and economic capital (e.g., investment and reinvestment) facing distressed neighborhoods and offer solutions to address local needs.

Course ID: EDEV 1032P
Course Format: Classroom

Important Course Information

Available Classroom Sections

There are no available sections for this course. Please check back later.

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CRN Start date End date Format Location Cost
17472 Jun 15, 2017 Jun 16, 2017 Classroom Atlanta, GA $800

Special Discount

Non-IEDC Members Price Breakdown

  • Early Bird Rate (Before May 3, 2017): $640*
  • Regular Rate (May 4-June 14, 2017): $780*
  • On-site Rate (June 15, 2017): $800

IEDC members receive $150 off non-IEDC member prices with coupon code.* Please contact Leigh Hopkins if you have not received your code in the mail.

*The discounted rate will reflect in your shopping cart at checkout.

 

Who Should Attend

Economic development practitioners, local government officials, planners, chambers of commerce, real estate professionals, site selectors, consultants

How You Will Benefit

  • Learn to identify the major neighborhood actors, their objectives, and strategies for redevelopment
  • Understand the process for creating a strategic economic development plan to meet the neighborhood development goals
  • Examine social capital (e.g., linkages, networks, talent, etc.), environmental capital (e.g., stewardship, residual management, etc.) and economic capital (e.g., investment and reinvestment) facing distressed neighborhoods and offer solutions to address local needs.

Content

  • Basic tools and strategies used to economically improve neighborhoods.
  • How you can engage in effective working relationships with various stakeholders.
  • Importance of urban design, political and financial support, and the role of retail and non-retail establishments in strengthening the economic foundation of neighborhoods
  • How economic developers can use banking, local markets, entrepreneurship among other targeted strategies to support and enhance their economic development activity
  • Learn the economic recovery process to stabilize the community‘s economic base after a disaster.

For Course-Related Questions

Please contact the course administrator: Leigh Hopkins, AICP